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Monday, October 19, 2020 | History

6 edition of Epicurus" ethical theory found in the catalog.

Epicurus" ethical theory

the pleasures of invulnerability

by Phillip Mitsis

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  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Cornell University Press in Ithaca .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Epicurus -- Ethics,
  • Ethics, Ancient

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPhillip Mitsis.
    SeriesCornell studies in classical philology ;, v. 48
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB573 .M58 1988
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 184 p. ;
    Number of Pages184
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2062770M
    ISBN 10080142187X
    LC Control Number88047746

    Additional Physical Format: Online version: Mitsis, Phillip. Epicurus' ethical theory. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, (OCoLC) Named Person. The following is based on the French translation found in the best Epitome of all things Epicurean in the French language: the page tome titled Les Epicuriens [Bibliotheque de la Pleiade] (French Edition). A central concept here is the problem of causal responsibility, and whether this responsibility can be attached to our initial constitution (our nature, our physiology), to the.

    Epicureanism, in a strict sense, the philosophy taught by Epicurus (– BCE). In a broad sense, it is a system of ethics embracing every conception or form of life that can be traced to the principles of his philosophy. In popular parlance, Epicureanism means devotion to pleasure, comfort, and high living. Epicurus and Democritean Ethics is a study of the ethical tradition of the Democriteans and how Epicurus responds to it. Warren acknowledges that Epicurus appropriates aspects of Democritean thought: its stand against teleology, its rejection of meddling deities, and its advocacy of peace of mind.

    4. The Epicurean psychology assumes psychological hedonism as a theory of human motivation. Epicurus takes it for granted that humans are motivated to maximize their own pleasure and minimize their own pain. He adds to this the ethical hedonistic doctrine which asserts that they ought to so act. Absent from Epicurus’ ethics is the idea of a “universal good” or “ultimate purpose” for humanity. This is in part due to his theory of the universe as being composed of atoms and space. In his view, there was no ethereal, non-physical substance that could make up a soul or disembodied mind.


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Epicurus" ethical theory by Phillip Mitsis Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ethical theory of the Greek philosopher Epicurus (– B.C.) is commonly taken to be narrowly egoistic, and there is ample evidence in his writings to support this view―for example, in his maxims on friendship, his emphasis on the utility of Cited by:   By Phillip Mitsis Epicurus Ethical Theory: The Pleasures of Invulnerability (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology) (1st Frist Edition) [Hardcover] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

By Phillip Mitsis Epicurus Ethical Theory: The Pleasures of Invulnerability (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology) (1st Frist Edition) [Hardcover]Manufacturer: Cornell University Press.

Ethics is the most important part of the Epicurus philosophy. Philosophy, says Epicurus, has to help man find happiness. And happiness is based on two principles, the autarky (autonomy), and the. Book Description: The ethical theory of the Greek philosopher Epicurus ( B.C.) is commonly taken to be narrowly egoistic, and there is ample evidence in his writings to support this view-for example, in his maxims on friendship, his emphasis on the utility.

Epicurus' Ethical Theory: The Pleasures of Invulnerability. Cornell University Press, Pp. ix & (cf. the subtitle of the book) as the focus of Epicurean ethics; it serves as the basis for a more informed appreciation Epicurus ethical theory book the strengths and limitations of an ethical system with such a commitment.

In chapter 1 ("Pleasure, Happiness. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive.

We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new. Epicurus (ca. B.C.) founded one of the most famous and influential philosophical schools of antiquity. In these remains of his vast output of scientific and ethical writings, we can trace Epicurus’ views on atomism, physical sensation, duty, morality, the soul, and the nature of the gods.

View on Amazon Read online. Epicurus had developed a systemic view on what were, by that time, pretty much agreed to be the standard areas of philosophical inquiry. So, he had a view on natural philosophy; he had a view on what he called ‘canonic’ or logic, which includes epistemology for us, and also on ethics.

Review Essay: Epicurus' Ethical Theory: The Pleasures of Invulnerability MARTHA NUSSBAUM Brown University This is a very good book on an important and neglected topic.

This being the case, I hope I shall be forgiven if I begin by saying something about the topic and the reasons for its neglect. Epicurus’s Moral Theory Epicurus was an ancient Greek philosopher who wrote moral and philosophical ethics.

In his essays, Letter to Menoeceus and Principal Doctrines, Epicurus writes that happiness and pleasure are key to living a good life. This study examines various inconsistencies in Epicurus' ethical theory and attempts to trace them to a common source, namely, his claim that eudaimonia is entirely up to us and invulnerable to outside intrusions.

The first chapter discusses his hedonism and shows the Categories: Epicurus in Ancient Greek and Roman. The teachings of Epicurus—about life and death, religion and science, physical sensation, happiness, morality, and friendship—attracted legions of adherents throughout the ancient Mediterranean world and deeply influenced later European thought.4/5().

Epicurus' Ethical Theory: The Pleasures of Invulnerability. Phillip Mitsis. Cornell University Press (). Epicurus An Introduction To His Practical Ethics And Politics By Michael Erler practical ethics article about practical ethics by the.

epicurus an introduction author john m rist. epicureanism. epicurus for today issue philosophy now. epicurus s moral theory maegan hanlon. epicureanism doctrine of epicurus britannica.

Epicurus, (born bc, Samos, Greece—diedAthens), Greek philosopher, author of an ethical philosophy of simple pleasure, friendship, and retirement. He founded schools of philosophy that survived directly from the 4th century bc until the 4th century ad.

Read More on This Topic Epicureanism: Doctrine of Epicurus. “All Hellenistic schools seem to define [wisdom] in approximately the same terms: first and foremost, as a state of perfect peace of mind.

From this viewpoint, philosophy appears as a remedy for human worries, anguish, and misery brought about, for the Cynics, by social constraints and conventions; for the Epicureans, by the quest for false pleasures; for the Stoics, by the pursuit of. Epicurus wrote a treatise entitled Κανών, or Rule, in which he explained his methods of investigation and theory of knowledge.

This book, however, has not survived, nor does any other text that fully and clearly explains Epicurean epistemology, leaving only mentions of this epistemology by Era: Hellenistic philosophy.

About Epicurus. Epicurus ( B.C.) was born in Samos and died in Athens. He studied at Plato's Academy when it was run by Xenocrates. Later, when he joined his family on Colophon, Epicurus studied under Nausiphanes, who introduced him to the philosophy of /7 Epicurus bought a house in Athens.

The Epicurean philosophical system has enjoyed much recent scrutiny, but the question of its philosophical ancestry remains largely neglected. This book traces its origins in the fifth-century BC atomist Democritus, in his fourth-century followers such as Anaxarchus and Pyrrho, and in Epicurus' disagreements with his own Democritean teacher Nausiphanes.

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. Mitsis, P. () Epicurus’ Ethical Theory: The Pleasures of Invulnerability, Ithaca, NY/London: Cornell University Press. Warren, J. () Epicurus and Democritean Ethics. An Archaeology of Ataraxia, Cambridge University Press.

Epicurus held that a social ethical system would maintain in the absence of universal values enforced by deities, because it is less fear and anxiety inducing (painful) to live in a society where mutual trust and safety are ensured. In order to maximize pleasure, a person must minimize the fear of reprisal.In this book, Tim O'Keefe reconstructs the theory of freedom of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus (–/0 BCE).

Epicurus' theory has attracted much interest, but our attempts to understand it have been hampered by reading it anachronistically as the discovery of the modern problem of free will and determinism.Reclaiming Epicurus, by Luke Slattery – SH says is a good short book.

Letters on Happiness by Peter Saint-Andre. Both books by DeWitt were recommended by Ross. Epicurus and his philosophy has a cult following among some modern Epicureans.

Others criticize “that it is very hefty, not the most accessible, and ultimately only so useful when it.